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Father Senan (Ed.) The Capuchin Annual 1942, 1941 Father Senan (Ed.) The Capuchin Annual 1942, 1941

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ISBN: 978-1-84630-623-X
Number of Pages: 699
File Size: 224 Mb
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First published in December 1929, this edition is the December 1941 edition for 1942, and it is possibly one of the most eclectic annuals ever produced. The aim of the annual, published by the Capuchins in Ireland, was to "provide a complete and worthy survey of everything worthwhile in the life of resurgent Ireland". With numerous contributors and photographers the it focused on literary and artistic contributions, but was never afraid to discuss religion, politics and science between it's covers. The annual also had a stated aim of nurturing new young talent.

This edition of the Annual is of particular interest as it was published shortly after the 25th anniversary of the 1916 Rising. With about 270 pages dedicated to the Easter Rising in Ireland, this edition provided a unique look at the events of the 1916 Rising as well as the commemorations. Included are personal recollections of Fr. Aloysius, a member of the Capuchin order, as well as Dr. James Ryan T.D., then Minister for Agriculture, Senator Margaret M. Pearse and Commandant Paddy Holahan. Also included are pieces on Terence McSwiney and Pearse as well as numerous other contributions as well as nearly 100 pages of photographs and original documents.

The rest of the annual is made up of various pieces, including several on religious orders in Ireland, their work with the poor, as well as portrait photographs of many the religious leaders in Ireland. Along with several short stories and poems, there are numerous impressive illustrations, as well as a fascinating debate on the place of vivisection in modern science and medicine. This is a historically, politically and religiously fascinating publication and a must for anyone with an interest in Easter 1916 or the Capuchin order in Ireland.

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John Curry M.D. An Historical and Critical Review of the Civil Wars in Ireland, from the Reign of Queen Elizabeth to the Settlement under King William (2 Vols), 1786 John Curry M.D. An Historical and Critical Review of the Civil Wars in Ireland, from the Reign of Queen Elizabeth to the Settlement under King William (2 Vols), 1786

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ISBN: 1-84630-622-1
Number of Pages: 826
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Published posthumously in 1786, John Curry's Review of the Civil Wars in Ireland is an extensive and balanced look at a time of enormous turmoil in Ireland. Curry was a highly regarded medical doctor, he was also a very insightful scholar of Irish history. Tracing his own ancestry back to the O'Corra family, his family took an active role in Irish political affairs. His grandfather was killed at the battle of Aughrim commanding a troop of horse in the army of King James. Having been bared from studying at the University of Dublin because of his religion Curry moved to Paris to study medicine, before returning to Dublin to practice.

The book itself is split over two volumes. Volume one begins with the state of the country and its inhabitants from the time of Henry II. Covering several insurrections, the Spanish invasion, the condition of the country at various stages, the flight of the earls, the enforcement of the penal laws, the Irish parliament, the surrender of the earl or Ormond and volume one finishes a Ormond prepares to the country.

Volume two begins with Ormond's return and the peace of 1648, which was followed by the arrival of Cromwell in Ireland and the end of the Confederate wars in Ireland. Volume two concludes with the Williamite-Jacobite war and the surrender of Limerick.

Following the conclusion of this part of volume two there is another long section on the State of Catholics in Ireland which is followed by lengthy appendices.

For anyone wishing to learn more about this period of Irish history this is a very valuable publication.

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Alexander M. Sullivan (and James Luby) The Story of Ireland, A Narrative of Irish History, from the earliest ages to the Insurrection of 1867. (1884) Alexander M. Sullivan (and James Luby) The Story of Ireland, A Narrative of Irish History, from the earliest ages to the Insurrection of 1867. (1884)

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ISBN: 1-84630-591-8

Originally published in 1867, this is the 1884 'American edition' of The Story of Ireland, which was first published by Henry McElroy in Providence Rhode Island in 1884. This American edition of the Story of Ireland is fully titled The Story of Ireland; A Narrative of Irish History, From the Earliest Ages to the Insurrection of 1867. Written for the Youth of Ireland by Alexander M. Sullivan, M.P., with a Supplementary Sketch of Later Events by James Luby. Illustrated with Numerous Sketches. Containing 650 printed pages, this edition is republished here on fully-searchable CD-Rom.

The Story of Ireland was written by Alexander Martin Sullivan (1830-1884), an Irish politician, journalist and lawyer. Together with his elder brother, Timothy Daniel Sullivan, they turned The Nation, the mouthpiece of the Young Ireland movement, into one of the most influential organs of Irish nationalism between 1861 and his death in 1884. Sullivan served twice a Member of Parliament, first for Louth and in 1880 for Meath, taking over the seat from Charles Stewart Parnell. On his death Sullivan was succeeded as Member of Parliament for Meath by Michael Davitt. Sullivan was also a prominent lawyer and Queen's Council. He last memorable case was the defence of Patrick O'Donnell for the murder of the British informer, James Carey. The Story of Ireland includes many pen and ink sketches of the Irish nationalist acquaintances of Sullivan, including John Mitchel and Michael Davitt and towards the end of the publication a sketch of Patrick O'Donnell. The Story of Ireland was originally published when Sullivan was serving time in jail for the nationalist sentiments published by him and his brother in The Nation and this American Edition of the publication was issued at the time of Sullivan's death. Sullivan's belief in the Irish nationalist cause was continued by his son, also A. M. Sullivan, who like his father became a prominent lawyer, most famously defending Roger Casement for treason in 1916.

Alexander Sullivan's intentions for writing and publishing The Story of Ireland were made manifest in his author's note to the first edition. In this he states that 'this little book is written for young people' 'who deserve more attention than has hitherto been paid them by our Irish book writers' and it was to them and 'the Irish nation of the future' that The Story of Ireland was dedicated. Sullivan does his 'little book' a disservice; packed with fascinating narrative accounts of the major political events in Irish history, from the the then earliest known periods of Irish history down to the failed Rising of 1867, Sullivan's style is both both personal and informative, which make for both an interesting and easy read. Containing eighty-eight chapters of narrative on such events as the arrival of the Danes, the Battle of Clontarf and the death of Brian Boru, the establishment of the Anglo-Normans in Ireland, the Rebellion of Silken Thomas, the Reformation, King James and King William in Ireland, the Battle of the Boyne, the Irish in Exile, 1798, the Union, the Rise of O'Connell, the Famine and 1867 are to name just a few. This Edition includes a supplement written by James Luby, which narrates the events of the 1867 Fenian Rising, the Rise and Fall of the Land League and concludes with the Phoenix Park Murders. Replete with many pen-and-ink sketches of prominent Irish nationalist and written by one of their own, The Story of Ireland is an insight to the political and historical worldview of 19th century Irish nationalism..

 


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Reminiscences of Sir Charles Cameron, C.B, 1913 Reminiscences of Sir Charles Cameron, C.B, 1913

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ISBN: 1-84630-589-6

Originally published in Dublin and London in 1913, the Reminiscences of Sir Charles A. Cameron, C.B., is here republished on fully-searchable CD-Rom.

Sir Charles Alexander Cameron (1830-1921) was born in Dublin, one of three children of Ewen Cameron, a soldier. Cameron studied medicine on Dublin and chemistry in Germany and was appointed Professor to the Dublin Chemical Society at the age of 23. Awarded a Fellowship of the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland in 1874 he also obtained a diploma in Public Health from Cambridge University and it was in the area of public health that Cameron undertook his most important work. Cameron held the post of Medical Officer for health for more than 50 years until his death and during this period he played a key role in improving the living conditions for the poor of Dublin and for this work he received a large number of honours, including a knighthood and the highest civic award the Corporation of the City of Dublin could afford: Honorary Freeman of the City.

Apart from his numerous articles for medical journals Cameron was also the theatre critic for the Irish Times; correspondent and co-owner of the Agricultural Review, and a reputed great socializer. A staunch unionist, Cameron was equally at home in the company of actresses and royalty. His last public appointment was camp inspector for Frongoch, North Wales, where hundreds of the participants in the Easter Rising were interned.

Sir Charles Cameron's Reminiscences are recorded in just under two-hundred printed pages and detail the myriad of events and experienced during a long and industrious life. These reminiscences are noted in some eighty or so anecdotes, which at times range from the sublime to the incredulous. Writing in his eighties Cameron was brought to book for a number of his reminiscences, which critics claimed, even at the time of their publication, were pure fabrication. Whether or not this fabrication extends to some of his more famous anecdotes is unclear. For example, in the reminiscences King Edward VII in a Dublin Slum, Cameron recounts an event that 'took place' in 1885, when the young Prince of Wales - the future King Edward VII - accompanied by the Duke of Clarence, Sir Dighton Probyn and Cameron took a plain unidentifiable carriage into the Dublin slums of Golden Lane where the Duke of Clarence slipped and fell in a discharge of watery cabbage running in a gulley down the side of the road. Further anecdotes include massive dinners attended by Cameron, banquets, notes on actresses and opera singers that he had met, trials in which he provided expert testimony, jokes in official publications and a meeting with Winston Churchill to name but a few. However, Cameron returns time and again to the crusade of his life: the conditions of the working poor in Dublin and it is to these that he pays respect in his last two reminiscences entitled 'How the Dublin Poor Live' and 'Earnings of the Poor'.

Sometimes witty, sometimes unbelievable, but always readable, Sir Charles Cameron's Reminiscences record the memories of an eighty-year-old man who had enjoyed a life well lived. 


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Donough Bryan, Gerald Fitzgerald, The Great Earl of Kildare (1456-1513), 1933 Donough Bryan, Gerald Fitzgerald, The Great Earl of Kildare (1456-1513), 1933

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ISBN: 1-84630-581-0

This biography of The "Great Earl", Gerald, 8th earl of Kildare by Donough Bryan is an important landmark in the scholarship of late mediaeval Ireland. Bryan's research was excellent and typified the emerging commitment to evidence based history. Tragically Bryan died before he could complete his research aged only 28, but his mentor, Professor Edmund Curtis of Trinity College, ensured that the work was completed and published in 1933.

Gerald Fitzgerald, 8th earl of Kildare (1456-1513) was a towering political figure. Often referred to as the "uncrowned King of Ireland" he was both the King's representative in Ireland and often the greatest threat to royal authority. By allying himself with the powerful O'Neills in Ulster, and other Gaelic and Anglo-Norman lineages, he created an imposing bloc of mutually dependent interest groups. His success in achieving this authority, and maintaining it, is the principal theme of Bryan's work.

Bryan covers all aspects of the history of this time with skill and evident knowledge. The book is a must for all scholars of this period. 


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W.P. O'Brien, The Great Famine in Ireland and a Retrospect of the fifty years 1845-1895 with a sketch of the present condition and future prospects of the Congested Districts, 1896 W.P. O'Brien, The Great Famine in Ireland and a Retrospect of the fifty years 1845-1895 with a sketch of the present condition and future prospects of the Congested Districts, 1896

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ISBN: 1-84630-562-4

Written by W. P. O'Brien, and published in 1896, The Great Famine in Ireland is the observations of a civil servant of the causes and events of the famine in Ireland, as well as changes in the subsequent 50 years and recommendations as to how the Congested Districts could be improved. It is the unique insight and interpretations of a government official in Ireland.

O'Brien begins by setting the scene in Ireland on the eve of the Famine in 1845, describing the political situation, the agricultural system as it existed, how the poor law system had been introduced in Ireland as well as the numerous previous potato crop failures. Following on from this he deals with the outbreak of the disease in the crop in Ireland, its symptoms and effects, the extent of the failure of the crop in 1845 and the total failure in 1846. Covered next is the steps taken by the government for the purposes of relief in 1846 and 1847, including the Board of Works. The major part of this relief was the work of the Poor Law Commission and the extension of the workhouse system. There is also mention of work carried out by private sources such as the Society of Friends and the British Relief Association, as well as by private individuals like Mr. J. H. Tuke.

The final part of the publication is made up with Ireland after the famine, the improvements made, the success of the emigration schemes promoted by Mr. Tuke, and dealing with further potato crop failures. Another feature of this section is how the Congest Districts Boards can be modified to deal with future emergencies.

This publication is a unique and insightful view of the Great Famine which not only provides details on the distress and official responses to the problem but also tracks the changes which occurred in Ireland because of the famine. 


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R. J. Kelly, A Patriot Prelate, The Late Most. Rev. Dr. Duggan, Bishop of Clonfert 1872-1896, 1917 R. J. Kelly, A Patriot Prelate, The Late Most. Rev. Dr. Duggan, Bishop of Clonfert 1872-1896, 1917

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ISBN: 1-84630-315-X

First published in Dublin in 1917 by the Catholic Truth Society and republished here on fully-searchable CD-Rom is A Patriot Prelate: The Late Most Rev. Dr. Duggan, Bishop of Clonfert, 1872-1896.

This little pamphlet, amounting to forty-eight printed pages, was introduced by its author, R. J. Kelly, K. C., as a sketch of the life of Rev. Dr. Patrick Duggan, who was described on the frontis piece of the pamphlet as a 'hero and a saint'. This appellation was given by Sir Wilfred Scawen Blunt who new Duggan intimately during his time in Ireland when both men were personally involved in the Land War that was ravaging the country in the late 1880s. Writing in 1912 in the fourth volume of his biography entitled The Land War in Ireland, Blunt provides an intimate portrait of the man who became known as the 'Patriot Prelate'. When Blunt first met Duggan in the Summer of 1888 Duggan was Bishop of Clonfert and was described by Blunt as the 'most wonderful and enchanting old man I have seen for many years. A venerable and altogether simple personage, with straggling white hair and cassock, much bedabbled with snuff' Duggan was held in high esteem by many of the leaders of the Tenants' Rights movement from William O'Brien, to Charles Stewart Parnell and Michael Davitt. Blunt records that when speaking of Davitt a smile broke out on Duggan's face as if he had spoken of a saint. This respect was mutual and after repeating a conversation he had had with Blunt, Duggan had told the Bishop that he had been called a 'Fenian and a Saint', which appeared to have pleased the old priest.

The esteem and respect shown to Duggan by the likes of Davitt, Blunt and Parnell was a long time in the making. Born in 1813 at Cummer, Co. Galway, Duggan was ordained in 1841 as curate of the parish of Kilmoylan and Cummer. It was here that he witnessed the ravages wrought by the Famine on his congregation when he witnessed sights that were never to leave him and would influence much of his later actions and attitudes to the British Administration in Ireland. Elevated to the Bishopric of Clonfert at the beginning of 1872 and in the same year he openly supported the pro-tenant-rights candidate Captain J.P. Nolan in the County Galway by-election. Although Nolan won the election the result was declared void due to Duggan's undue clerical influence and Duggan and others found themselves involved in a lengthy and costly legal battle at the Court of Common Pleas. The case collapsed and Duggan was acquitted. A decade later Duggan openly supported the Home Rule movement at which time he was asked by Michael Cusack and others to become the patron for the planned Gaelic Athletic Association. Duggan declined due to ill health and suggest Thomas Croke, Archbishop of Cashel and Emly in his stead.

The Patriot Prelate describes all of the major events in Duggan's life from his ordination, his Famine Experiences and involvement in both the campaigns for Tenants' Rights and Home Rule and well as a number of passages of reminiscences by those closely associated with the Bishop. A very readable sketch of the life of this influential and important priest. 


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Edward Raymond Turner, Ireland and England, In the Past and Present, 1919 Edward Raymond Turner, Ireland and England, In the Past and Present, 1919

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ISBN: 1-84630-309-5

Published in New York in 1919 and republished here on fully-searchable CD-Rom is the first edition of Edward Raymond Turner's Ireland & England in the Past and in the Present. Containing some 504 printed pages, the original publication is fully-indexed, and concerns itself with the complex relationship between England and Ireland from the earliest times to the present - in this case 1919. The central thesis of Turner's publication is that Ireland 'deserved' its freedom from England and that the majority of the people of Great Britain 'wished Ireland well and [were] resolved to do complete justice' in this aspiration.

While Turner's thesis can be seen in hindsight as somewhat naïve, his views on the complex relationship that had brought Ireland and England to the point of war at the time of his publication are viewed through the synthesis of an American academic with Irish ancestry.

Turner (1881-1929), an America historian and academic, was professor of history at the University of Michigan. The author of still widely read Women's Suffrage in New Jersey and The Negro in Pennsylvania; Slavery-Servitude-Freedom, 1639-1861, the later of which was written under the biennial Justin Winsor Prize.

Ireland and England is divided into three parts. The first traces the history of settlement and civilisation in Ireland starting from the pre-Christian establishment of Gaelic Society, the spread and rapid conversion to Christianity and the arrival of the Anglo-Normans and the subjection of the native peoples. Part I is concluded with the advent of Henry Grattan's Parliament, the Union with Great Britain and the impact of the Famine on the political Union.

Part II provides an analysis of the attempts made by Great Britain to redress the grievances of the Irish without granting full independence. These include the Disestablishment of the Church of Ireland, the various attempts of introducing a more equitable form of land tenure and the various land legislation that this entailed before ending with the various attempts to introduce Home Rule with an analysis of the arguments for and against this course of action.

Part III gives the arguments for independence as Turner saw them at the time of writing. Beginning with the Irish revival movement and the existence of the Irish language and literature he then dwells on the attitudes of Ireland towards Britain at the time of WWI, the conscription crises, the growth of Sinn Fein, before concluding with some attempt to explain the complex relationship between America and Britain over the 'Irish Question'.

Well written and very readable, Ireland and England does not profess to be a scholarly work. However, it is a synthesis of ideas and facts, that should appeal to anyone who is just starting to examine and consider the complex relationship between Britain, Ireland and America as this existed on the very cusp of Irish independence. 


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Rev. P.A. Canon Sheehan DD, Literary life: Essays and Poems, 1921 Rev. P.A. Canon Sheehan DD, Literary life: Essays and Poems, 1921

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ISBN: 1-84630-310-9

First published in Dublin in 1921 and republished here on fully-searchable CD-Rom is the Literary Life, Essays & Poems of the Very Reverend Patrick Augustine Sheehan, invariably known as Canon Sheehan of Doneraile. Containing some 267 printed pages, Literary Life is an edited collection of some of Canon Sheehan's most notable essays and in this first edition also a collection of poetry, which is often absent from later editions of this publication, the most recent of which was issued in paperback in 2009.

Born on St. Patrick's Day 1852 at Mallow, Co. Cork, to a shopkeeper, both of Sheehan's parents died when he was quite young and he and his siblings were entrusted to the care of priest-relative, Dr. John McCarthy, who would later become Bishop of Cloyne. Initially educated at the Long Room School, Mallow, where one of class mates was William O'Brien, later journalist, parliamentarian and MP, with who Sheehan would co-found the All For Ireland League, and later at St. Colman's College, Fermoy, and St. Patrick's College, Maynooth; it was while studying at Fermoy that Sheehan witnessed first-hand the Fenian Rising of 1867. This had a profound affect on Canon Sheehan, which was amply vented in some of prose works, such as The Graves of Kilmorna.

Beginning his priestly ministry in Exeter and while here he acted as chaplain to Dartmoor prison where some prisoners convicted of treason felony after the Fenian Rising were still being held. Returning to Ireland in 1877, Sheehan first took-up the curacy of Mallow, before being transferred to Cobh and was then appointed parish priest of Doneraile in 1895, the ministry of which he retained until his death. Highly regarded by the the tenantry and Viscount Doneraile alike, with Sheehan's insight and help, the majority of Viscount Doneraile's tenant had purchased their landholdings by 1903 on terms acceptable to both tenant and landlord without acrimony or violence, which was in stark contrast to neighbouring estates, such as the Kingston estate. In 1903, in Response to the Wyndham Land Act and the later actions of John Redmond's Parliamentary Party, Sheehan co-founded with William O'Brien, the All-for-Ireland-League, writing the manifesto for the League, which espoused Catholic-Protestant co-operation and inclusivity in every walk of life, aptly expressed in his 1911 novel, the Intellectuals.

A prolific author, towards the end of his life Sheehan had become somewhat of a literary celebrity and between 1903 and his death he met many times and corresponded frequently with the American justice, Oliver Wendell Homes. Amongst many of Sheehan's most enduring literary works are Geoffrey Austin, Student (1895), The Triumph of Failure (1899) - the title adopted for Patrick Pearse's biography - My New Curate (1900), Luke Delmege (1901), Glenanaar (1905), Lisheen (1907), The Blindness of Dr. Gray (1909), The Queen's Fillet (1911), Miriam Lucas (1912) and The Graves of Kilmorna (1915).

Through Sheehan's actions and works he preached tolerance and co-existence, themes, which are amply explored in a selection of essays, poems and prose issued after his death in The Literary Life, Essays and Poems of Canon Sheehan of Doneraile. 


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Michael J.F. McCarthy, Five Years in Ireland 1895-1900, 1901 Michael J.F. McCarthy, Five Years in Ireland 1895-1900, 1901

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ISBN: 1-84630-278-1

First published in London & Dublin in 1901 and republished here on fully-searchable CD-Rom is Michael J. F. McCarthy's Five Years in Ireland. Containing over 600 printed pages the original publication contains many illustrations by some of the best-known photographers in Ireland at the time, notably Lawrence and Lafayette, which include numerous portraits as well as landscapes.

Michael John Fitzgerald McCarthy was born in Midleton, Co. Cork, the son of Denis McCarthy and Catherine McCarthy. Educated initially at the Vincentian Seminary and Midleton College, McCarthy gained his BA from Trinity College, Dublin, in 1885 and wad called to the Irish bar in 1889. Until the publication of Five Years in Ireland few would have heard of McCarthy and little attention has been paid to his numerous publications for the past century. However, at the time of the publication of Five Years in Ireland and subsequent works, McCarthy was one of the most controversial best-sellers in Ireland, greatly influencing contemporaries such as James Joyce.

Michael McCarthy is noted, almost uniquely for his time, as an anti-clerical Irish nationalist and despite or perhaps because of his upbringing and early education he was gravely concerned about the role and influence of the Roman Catholic Church in all aspects of Irish life and how these influences had a detrimental effect on the progress of the Irish nation, especially at the point of Ireland's imminent independence. McCarthy questioned the church's wealth and role and so trenchant was his anti-Catholicism that despite being regarded as an Irish nationalist he opposed Home Rule and independence and his anti-Catholic views were much-lauded by Ulster Unionists. McCarthy's best-known anti-clerical publication, Priests and People in Ireland was published immediately after Five Years in Ireland in 1902, which criticised the church's spending, running of schools and lack of oversight by the Government in exercising any control over the church in Ireland. Needless to say, the Catholic Church did not remain silent over McCarthy's attack on it and issued many refutations, notably by Fr. Michael O'Riordan is his Catholicity and Progress published in 1905.

In his introductory remarks 'why the author wrote this book', McCarthy states that his work progresses the reader would become aware of 'the evidences of the power assumed by the priests in Ireland' and 'was it right for the present generation of priests, to further increase the calls and claims of clericalism on the Catholic population?' McCarthy suggest not. To this end Five Years in Ireland producing many of the evidences that in McCarthy's opinion that had been the result of undue clerical influence in Irish society, some of which are a little peculiar, but nonetheless of great interest. These include the infamous last witch case in Ireland and the murder of Bridget Cleary by her husband and a number of associates due to Cleary's belief that his wife was a witch. The cause of the murder and the subsequent sentence of manslaughter were both the result of the influence, in McCarthy's opinion, of the influence of the Church. Other evidences offered by the author include evictions, the shadowing of politics by the growth of ecclesiasticism and much more besides.

The original publication is fully-indexed and illustrated and provides one of the few historical critiques of the role of the Church in Ireland written by a man who was the product of a Catholic middle class family who had been trained in a seminary and published prior to Irish independence. 


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The Abbé Mac Geoghegan (translated by Patrick O'Kelly), The History of Ireland, Ancient and Modern, 1848 The Abbé Mac Geoghegan (translated by Patrick O'Kelly), The History of Ireland, Ancient and Modern, 1848

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ISBN: 1-84630-203-X
Number of Pages: 634
File Size: 67 Mb
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The History of Ireland Ancient and Modern was written by Abbé James MacGeoghegan and was originally written in French and published in three volumes between 1758 and 1763 as Histoire de l'Irlande Ancienne et Moderne. The first two volumes of the history were first published in Paris and the last in Amsterdam. Republished here on fully-searchable CD-Rom is Patrick O'Kelly's translation into English of MacGeoghegan's work, which was published by D & J Sadlier in New York in 1848

Abbé James MacGeoghegan (1702-63) was born at Uisneach, Westmeath. Related to the defenders of Dunboy Castle against Carew and also Connell MacGeoghegan, translator of the Annals of Clonmacnoise. Like many of his class who were born after the enactment of the Penal Laws, James MacGeoghegan was sent abroad to receive an education, in his case the Lombard - later the Irish College - in Paris, were he was subsequently ordained into the Church. For five years MacGeoghegan served as vicar of Possy and in 1734 was elected as one of the Provisors of Lombard College. It was perhaps as chaplain to the Irish troops in the service of France that had most influence on MacGeoghegan's life and subsequent notoriety and it was during this period that he wrote his History of Ireland, dedicating the work to the Irish Brigades, in which he made the now-infamous statement that between the Treaty of Limerick in 1691 and 1741 some 450,000 Irish soldiers died in the service of France. MacGeoghegan died in 1763 and is buried in Paris.

First appearing in English in 1831 and published in Dublin, The History of Ireland Ancient and Modern, was translated from French by James O'Kelly, a language teacher who had resided in Paris in the early nineteenth-century. O'Kelly in his preface to the author noted that MacGeoghegan was ideally situated in Paris to have access to some of the best archival material relating to the ancient history of Ireland. However, as an emigre, MacGeoghegan was denied access to material that was available at the time in Ireland had had to rely for his accounts on the published works of Lynch and Colgan.

Containing some 630 printed pages, this edition of the History of Ireland Ancient and Modern, which includes MacGeoghegan's dedication and O'Kelly's biography of the author and an index, details the history of Ireland from the pre-Christian era through to the accession of James I in 1603 and is accompanied by a number full-page plates. The influence of MacGeoghegan's History of Ireland ensured that both he and his work would not be forgotten. In 1848 John Mitchell published his History of Ireland, which he claimed to be a continuation of MacGeoghegan's History. In this way the History of Ireland Ancient and Modern has long been associated with the cause of Irish nationalism, although in truth the work of MacGeoghegan, as his translator notes, was not in any way partisan, a statement that could not be applied to John Mitchell.

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Cusack's Life of Daniel O'Connell, The Liberator, His Times - Political, Social and Religious, 1872 Cusack's Life of Daniel O'Connell, The Liberator, His Times - Political, Social and Religious, 1872

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ISBN: 1-84630-148-3
Number of Pages: 836
File Size: 72 Mb
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First published in 1872, the Life of Daniel O'Connell, the Liberator, was written by Sister Mary Frances Cusack otherwise Margaret Anne Cusack, the 'Nun of Kenmare'. Born into a Protestant aristocratic family in Dublin, Cusack was received into the Catholic faith by Cardinal Wiseman in 1858 and in 1861 she was sent, with a small group of nuns from Newry, Co. Down, to establish a new branch of the Order of St. Clare, known as the Poor Clares - in Kenmare, Co. Kerry. While here Cusack established the Kenmare printing company and by 1870 more than 200,000 editions of her religious and historical works had been sold around the world, the profits from which established the Famine Relief Fund. In 1871 Cusack's works generated some £15,000 for the Fund and by the time of her death in 1899 she had written over 35 historical and religious books.

The Life of Daniel O'Connell, the Liberator was published by the Kenmare printing company and dedicated to 'the Catholic Priests and to the Catholic People of America'' and offered as the history of the 'Most illustrious Irishman of Ancient or Modern Times'. The biography extends to some 870 pages and is prefaced by a 42 page introduction.

Daniel O'Connell was born at Darrynane Abbey, a remote corner of Co. Kerry, in 1774 and by the time of his death had already entered into the pantheons of Irish heroes, his legacies enduring the test of time. The first chapter of Cusack's history details the life of O'Connell from his birth, early education and influences in Ireland and France through to 1790. Some 200 pages of the biography are given over to the influences engendered in O'Connell's early life, ranging from politics, the law, education and religion, that were to inform O'Connell's later political actions. Indeed, more than half of Cusack's biography pre-dates O'Connell's establishment of the Catholic Association.

Not surprisingly, great store is given in Cusack's biography to O'Connell's achievements and his eventual success with regard to Catholic Emancipation. However, writing only 25-years after the Liberator's death in 1847, Cusack glossed-over O'Connell's failure to achieve Repeal of the Union and the last decade of his life in a mere 60 pages. This is hardly surprising, given that this was one of the few blemishes on an otherwise illustrious career and an area of O'Connell's career that later historians have also struggled to unravel. The Life of Daniel O'Connell, the Liberator is concluded with extracts from the diary of O'Connell's personal servant and notes on the pedigree of the O'Connell family of Derrynane Abbey.

The Life of Daniel O'Connell, the Liberator is fully indexed and is searchable on this republication. This publication must appeal to anyone with an interest in Irish history in general and more specifically one of the greatest political figures in modern Irish history, written by a woman who has also passed into the annals of Irish history.

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Green's The Making of Ireland and its Undoing, 1200 - 1600 Green's The Making of Ireland and its Undoing, 1200 - 1600

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ISBN: 1-84630-116-5
Number of Pages: 525
File Size: 10 Mb
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Published during the height of the Irish cultural revival presaging the Easter Rising of 1916, Alice Stopford Green's The Making of Ireland and its Undoing: 1200-1600, was published in London in 1908.

The Making of Ireland & its Undoing concerns itself with the period spanning the two centuries after the Norman conquest of Ireland and end of the Tudor dynasty and posits the theory that some two-hundred years after the Norman invasion more than accommodation had been made with the invaders; indeed, by the onset of the Tudor dynasty and Henry VIII's ruinous Irish designs Gaelic Ireland, the Anglo-Normans and the later Anglo-Irish had coalesced to form a new confident and vibrant Ireland. This Ireland, Stopford Green believed, was far from the barbarism, the 'miserable estate' and 'rude people' that the Tudors would have history believe, in fact far from it. It was for Ireland's success and not its backwardness that Henry had to undo his closest economic and political rival.

Although the English had been in Ireland for centuries prior to Henry VIII, it was, as Stopford Green informs us only then that Ireland underwent a new type of invasion that was to lead to its undoing. In two parts entitled 'Trade and Industry' and 'Education and Learning' the reader is informed in considerable detail in excess of 500 pages how and why Ireland had developed so successfully in the spheres of commerce and trade, while also showing how developed the clan system and country had life had become by the early 1500s. Stopford Green then illustrates how disastrously these and invidiously destroyed first by Henry VIII and then by his daughter, Elizabeth I. As with Trade and Industry, in the realms of Irish and National Learning, Stopford Green professes Ireland to have been a place high learning, a national of bards, brehons and chroniclers as opposed to a the English newcomers, who in the main were greedy robbers.

The Making of Ireland and its Undoing was an important publication in 1908, not only for its uncompromising nationalist sentiment, but also its unique investigation of Irish economic history. Its presented an argument that shows how Ireland had expanded over a period of 400 years into a prosperous and self-confident nation that had managed to preserve and integrate many of its most ancient political, cultural and economic systems and why this very success necessitated their destruction by the later Tudor Monarchs and adventurers.

Republished in digital format, Alice Stopford Green's Making of Ireland and its Undoing is a must for anyone interested in Irish History and historiography.

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Barrington's The Rise and Fall of the Irish Nation, 1833 Barrington's The Rise and Fall of the Irish Nation, 1833

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ISBN: 1-84630-109-2
Number of Pages: 316
File Size: 249 Mb
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The tenor of the publication the Rise and Fall of the Irish Nation may be gained from its subtitle: A Full Account of the Bribery & Corruption by which the Union was carried; The Family Histories of the Members of Voted Away the Irish Parliament; With an Extraordinary Black List of the Title, Places, and Pensions which they Received for their Corrupt Votes.

Published in 1833 by James Duffy & Co., Sir Jonah Barrington, KC, LL.D's Rise & Fall of the Irish Nation details the machinations that led to the passing of the Act of Union of Great Britain and Ireland. As a participant in the events he records, Barrington is a far from impartial observer, and the time of his publication, as Repeal of the Act of Union was again being muted was perhaps no coincidence.

Barrington's Rise & Fall of the Irish Nation minutely details the events of the Irish legislature from the success of Henry Grattan in 1782 until the passing of the Act of Union between Great Britain in Ireland in 1800. As King's Counsel and Judge of the Admiralty, Barrington was well-placed, both as observer and participant, to record the machinations on both sides of the debate and probably provides as much intimate knowledge of the true events of 1799-1800 as some of the main protagonists such as Lord Castlereagh, Baron Nicholas Plunket and Henry Grattan.

Perhaps the most interesting portion of Barrington's publication appears in the last handful of pages, despite appearing in his lengthy title. Here he publishes his so-called Red and Black Lists, the author appearing on the former. The Red List accounts for every member of the Irish Parliament that voted against the Act of Union and the Black List, every member that voted for Union. The annotations besides the majority of those that voted for Union are salacious to say the least and Barrington obtusely records the patronage, titles and monies received by many of those that voted for the Union.

Republished in full-searchable digital format, covering some 200 pages, this republication is a must for anyone interested in the intimate, albeit rather one-sided, machinations surrounding the passing of the Act of Union.

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Denvir's The Irish in Britain, 1892 Denvir's The Irish in Britain, 1892

Ref: IET0077
ISBN: 1-84630-097-5
Number of Pages: 475
File Size: 20 Mb
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This extraordinary book was published in 1892 by the Liverpool author, journalist and political activist John Denvir. To this day it remains one of the most important sources we have about the nineteenth century Irish, as witnessed by its continued inclusion on university reading lists. The number of Irish people in Britain grew dramatically in the 1800s, especially in Liverpool. In 1841 over 50,000 Liverpudlians were Irish-born, which had increased to over 70,000 in 1881. These Irish settlers generally came looking for work, or to migrate further to the US but ran out of money. The hardships they experienced were extreme. Denvir had a unique understanding and appreciation of the Irish experience in Britain. Though born in Bushmills, Co. Antrim, he spent his life among the immigrant Irish in Liverpool. He grew up there during the Famine witnessing the horrors of the fleeing victims as they made their way to Liverpool. This had a permanent effect on his political outlook, and Denvir edited and published various Irish interest newspapers like The Irish Programme, The United Irishman and The Nationalist. These newspapers were pointedly political, and he played a leading role in the Irish National League. He had even been an active Fenian for a time.

The first 110 pages details the history of the Irish in Britain before 1800, and is best treated as background reading for the main body of his 462 page book! His coverage of the nineteenth century is quite a different matter. At its heart is an analysis of census figures and other statistical data about the settlement of the Irish in Britain, looking at each individual place that they settled in through time. But what brings his study alive is his own experience of the community, as well as the knowledge he had gained as a journalist over many decades. This is especially valuable when he looks at the experience of the vast majority of the urban Irish poor. He is also detailed about the important development of various Irish political movements in Britain, which he knew well, like the Repeal Movement, Young Ireland, the Fenians, Land League, and British movements with significant Irish involvement like the Chartists.

While Denvir's outlook is clearly political, it also contains a wealth of useful data about this neglected topic. In short it is an essential tool for those studying the Irish in Britain in the 19th century.

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John Mitchel, Jail Journal, 2nd ed., 1914 John Mitchel, Jail Journal, 2nd ed., 1914

Ref: IET0055
ISBN: 1-84630-071-1

Described as 'a classic of Irish revolutionary writing', John Mitchel's Jail Journal was first published in the New York Citizen, the journal established by Mitchel on his arrival in America, between 14th January and 19th August 1854. A subsequent edition of the Jail Journal was published in which Mitchel detailed his experiences in the United States between 1853 and 1866, the current electronic publication contains both. Throughout, the Jail Journal is replete with Mitchel's acerbic wit and anecdote detailing his prison experiences, transportation for Treason Felony and later reminiscences on his erstwhile colleagues. This edition of the Jail Journal is a must for any reader interested in the personalities of the Young Ireland Movement and the 1848 Rising and its aftermath.

This title is a DOWNLOAD. Please click the link on the receipt to initiate the download. If you would prefer a version on CD-ROM to be posted to you, please select the option below. It will cost an additional €6.00 (ex VAT) which includes all postage charges. 


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