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Parish Register Society of Dublin, The Registers of St. Catherine, Dublin, 1636-1715, 1908 Parish Register Society of Dublin, The Registers of St. Catherine, Dublin, 1636-1715, 1908

Ref: IE0361
ISBN: 1-84630-581-0

Printed for the Parish Register Society of Dublin by William Pollard & Co., and first published in 1908 is volume V of the Parish Register Society of Dublin, the Registers of St. Catherine, Dublin, 1636-1715. Republished here on fully-searchable CD-Rom the registers for St. Catherine are amongst the oldest surviving parish records in Ireland.

By Act of Parliament on 1875 the parish registers of the Established Church of Ireland were placed under the Control of the Master of the Rolls. However, by the time of the publication of volume I of the Parish Register Society in 1906, one of the main conditions of the Act, namely the concentration, collection and depositing of the parish registers of the former Established Church in the Public Record Office of Ireland in Dublin, had not taken place. In a sense and with hindsight this transpired to be fortuitous as many of the parochial records that did find their way to the Public Record Office were destroyed in the infamous 1922 fire. In line with the formation of a number of Parish Register Societies in England, it was deemed necessary by the founding members of the Parish Register Society of Dublin to make publicly available the older and more important surviving parish registers of the Established Church of Ireland, beginning with the oldest in the country, those of Dublin City, for the valuable work undertaken by genealogists and local and family historians.

There would appear to have been no obligation to keep parish registers in Ireland until the Canon of 1634, although there had been an abortive attempt to introduce a form of public registration as early as 1617. However, this was discontinued in 1620 in a row over fees, the year after the commencement of the St. John's registers, the oldest surviving parish registers in Ireland. The Canon of 1634 required every parish and chapel in Ireland to keep a book wherein must be written the day and year of every Christening, marriage and burial. The Canon does no appear to have been strictly enforced as no registers in Ireland begin immediately after the date of instruction. Only two registers in Ireland pre-date the Canon, that of St. John's and St. Brigid, Dublin and in only five other instances are registers known to pre-date 1642, amongst these are the registers for St. Catherine extracts for which date from 1636.

Although the earliest known parish register for St. Catherine dates from 1636, the first register that has survived in its entirety dates from 1679 to 1744. The earlier periods published by the Parish Register Society of Dublin were extracted from a manuscript held at Trinity College, Dublin, which contained entries for the parishes of Saints Catherine and James dating from 1636 and was supposed that a register had once existed for the parish that was begun in compliance with the Canon of 1634. Unfortunately, the entries taken from the Trinity College manuscript pertaining to St. Catherine constitute only a handful of pages of the Society's publication although they cover the considerable time period of 1636 to 1679. Until 1707 the parish of St. Catherine was united with those of St. James and St. John, Kilmainham, but was separated due to the unwieldy size of this parish. Among the many street and alley situated in the parish are Thomas Street, Patrick Street, Marrowbone Lane, Meath Street, Dolphin's Barn and Cornmarket. The parish was never a fashionable district, but because due to the nature of the patrons of the parish and the landlords that owned it many personages of high rank and status can be found in the parish registers.

Included in this publication are extracts taken from the Subsidy Roll of the City of Dublin pertaining to the parish of St. Catherine taken in 1637 and the Hearth Money Roll for the City for the years 1666-7. Included are extensive lists of persons and places appearing in the published register, which contains just over 300 printed pages republished here on fully-searchable CD-Rom. The republication of the Parish Registers for St. Catherine, Dublin, must remain as relevant to the genealogist and family historian today as they were when the registers were first published. 


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Parish Register Society of Dublin, The Registers of St. John the Evangelist Dublin, 1619-1699, 1906 Parish Register Society of Dublin, The Registers of St. John the Evangelist Dublin, 1619-1699, 1906

Ref: IE0358
ISBN: 1-84630-578-0

Printed for the Parish Register Society of Dublin by Alexander Thom & Co., and first published in 1906 is volume I of the Parish Register Society of Dublin, the Registers of St. John the Evangelist, 1619-1699. Republished here on fully-searchable CD-Rom the Registers of St. John the Evangelist were a fitting choice as the Society's first publication as these are the earliest known registers to have survived in Ireland.

By Act of Parliament on 1875 the parish registers of the Established Church of Ireland were placed under the Control of the Master of the Rolls. However, by the time of the publication of volume I one of the main conditions of the Act, namely the concentration, collection and depositing of the parish registers of the former Established Church in the Public Record Office of Ireland in Dublin, had not taken place. In a sense and with hindsight this transpired to be fortuitous as many of the parochial records that did find their way to the Public Record Office were destroyed in the infamous 1922 fire. In line with the formation of a number of Parish Register Societies in England, it was deemed necessary by the founding members of the Parish Register Society of Dublin to make publicly available the older and more important surviving parish registers of the Established Church of Ireland, beginning with the oldest in the country, those of Dublin City, for the valuable work undertaken by genealogists and local and family historians.

There would appear to have been no obligation to keep parish registers in Ireland until the Canon of 1634, although there had been an abortive attempt to introduce a form of public registration as early as 1617. However, this was discontinued in 1620 in a row over fees, the year after the commencement of the St. John's registers. The Canon of 1634 required every parish and chapel in Ireland to keep a book wherein must be written the day and year of every Christening, marriage and burial. The Canon does no appear to have been strictly enforced as no registers in Ireland begin immediately after the date of instruction. Only two registers in Ireland pre-date the Canon, that of St. John's and St. Brigid, Dublin and in only five other instances are registers known to pre-date 1642.

The Parish of St. John encompasses some of the oldest areas of Dublin, including Fishamble Street, Smock Alley, Winetavern Street, and the old Blind, Essex and Wood Quays. Due to its proximity to the quays and their numerous boarding houses, apart from the presence of fourteen ennobled families, bishops and the like, these early registers for St. John's contain numerous entries for transient and visiting individuals to Dublin. The entries contained in this publication were kept in two separate parchment registers; the first of 45 folios begins with the burial of John Hubbords on 12th June 1630 and the second contains 131 parchment folios. This publication also includes two very interesting and useful appendices. The first is the Churchwardens' Account Books, which include many interment and burial records not present in the parish registers; the second consists of lists of individuals rated for parish cess for the years 1621, 1646 and 1687. These lists provide the names of the cess payers, their addresses in the parish and in many cases the cess payers occupation. Included within the Registers are the remarkable lists of Poor English people who flooded into the parish as a result of the Rebellion of 1641 and who subsequently died and were buried in St. John's as well as a list of the poor soldiers buried in the parish after 24th April 1642.

The first volume of the Parish Register Society of Dublin is concluded with lists of place names and people. Containing some 349 printed pages the Parish Registers of St,. John the Evangelist, Dublin, are as relevant to the genealogists and family historian today as they were when the registers were first published. 


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Parish Register Society of Dublin, Marriage Entries in the Registers of the Parishes of S. Marie, S. Luke, S. Catherine and S. Werburgh, 1627-1800. 1915 Parish Register Society of Dublin, Marriage Entries in the Registers of the Parishes of S. Marie, S. Luke, S. Catherine and S. Werburgh, 1627-1800. 1915

Ref: IE0356
ISBN: 1-84630-576-4

Printed for the Parish Register Society of Dublin by William Pollard & Co., and first published in 1915 is volume XII of the series, the Marriage Entries in the Registers of the Parishes of St. Marie, St. Luke, St. Catherine & St. Werburgh, 1627-1800 Republished here on fully-searchable CD-Rom the these Marriage Records are the most complete that are available with missing entries from the originals being supplemented by the editor with records from the Dublin Grant Book, Prerogative Grant Book and annual Returns from Visitations and in the case of St. Werburgh from entries located in an Ms. Bible in Trinity College, Dublin.

By Act of Parliament in 1875 the parish registers of the Established Church of Ireland were placed under the Control of the Master of the Rolls. However, by the time of the publication of volume I of the Parish Register Society in 1906, one of the main conditions of the Act, namely the concentration, collection and depositing of the parish registers of the former Established Church in the Public Record Office of Ireland in Dublin, had not taken place. In a sense and with hindsight this transpired to be fortuitous as many of the parochial records that did find their way to the Public Record Office were destroyed in the infamous 1922 fire. In line with the formation of a number of Parish Register Societies in England, it was deemed necessary by the founding members of the Parish Register Society of Dublin to make publicly available the older and more important surviving parish registers of the Established Church of Ireland, beginning with the oldest in the country, those of Dublin City, for the valuable work undertaken by genealogists and local and family historians.

There would appear to have been no obligation to keep parish registers in Ireland until the Canon of 1634, although there had been an abortive attempt to introduce a form of public registration as early as 1617. However, this was discontinued in 1620 in a row over fees, the year after the commencement of the St. John's registers, the oldest surviving parish registers in Ireland. The Canon of 1634 required every parish and chapel in Ireland to keep a book wherein must be written the day and year of every Christening, marriage and burial. The Canon does no appear to have been strictly enforced as no registers in Ireland begin immediately after the date of instruction. Only two registers in Ireland pre-date the Canon, that of St. John's and St. Brigid, Dublin and in only five other instances are registers known to pre-date 1642.

Republished here are the entries from the Marriage Registers for the Parish of St. Marie, for the periods 1697-1800. These have been annotated by the editor and cross-referenced to the Dublin Grant Book as well as the Prerogative Grant Book. Entries not present in the Registers were located in the Returns of Visitations and they have been added to this publication making the entries in this publication more complete than the original registers alone. The republished Marriage Register for the Parish of St. Luke date from 1716 to 1800 and begin at the point of the foundation and consecration of the Church when it was separated from the parish of St. Nicholas Without. In most instances the street address of the bride is given and in many instances the parish of residence of one or both parties. The republished Marriage Register for the Parish of St. Catherine date from 1715 to 1800 and are a continuation of the records for the parish published in volume V by the Parish Register Society of Dublin. Entries for the periods 1788 to 1792 are absent from the original Register, but this gap has been filled by the editor using the annual Returns of Visitations, making this publication once again more complete that the original Registers. The Marriage Register for St. Werburgh cover the periods 1704 to 1800, with one page of additional entries for the years 1640 to 1663 taken from entries found by the editor in an Ms. Bible in Trinity College, Dublin. The Republication of this number in the series of the Parish Register Society of Dublin remains as relevant to the genealogist and family historian today as they were when the registers were first published. 


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The Parish Register Society of Dublin, Marriage Entries from the Registers of the Parishes St. Andrew, St. Anne, St. Audoen, & St. Bride 1632-1800 (1913) The Parish Register Society of Dublin, Marriage Entries from the Registers of the Parishes St. Andrew, St. Anne, St. Audoen, & St. Bride 1632-1800 (1913)

Ref: IE0353
ISBN: 1-84630-568-3

Printed for the Parish Register Society of Dublin by William Pollard & Co., and first published in 1913 is volume XI of the Parish Register Society of Dublin, the Marriage Entries for the Parishes of St. Andrew, St. Anne, St. Audoen & St. Bride, Dublin. Republished here on fully-searchable CD-Rom the registers are amongst the oldest surviving parish records in Ireland, and in three instances date from or very nearly to the foundations of the parishes in question.

By Act of Parliament on 1875 the parish registers of the Established Church of Ireland were placed under the Control of the Master of the Rolls. However, by the time of the publication of volume I of the Parish Register Society in 1906, one of the main conditions of the Act, namely the concentration, collection and depositing of the parish registers of the former Established Church in the Public Record Office of Ireland in Dublin, had not taken place. In a sense and with hindsight this transpired to be fortuitous as many of the parochial records that did find their way to the Public Record Office were destroyed in the infamous 1922 fire. In line with the formation of a number of Parish Register Societies in England, it was deemed necessary by the founding members of the Parish Register Society of Dublin to make publicly available the older and more important surviving parish registers of the Established Church of Ireland, beginning with the oldest in the country, those of Dublin City, for the valuable work undertaken by genealogists and local and family historians.

There would appear to have been no obligation to keep parish registers in Ireland until the Canon of 1634, although there had been an abortive attempt to introduce a form of public registration as early as 1617. However, this was discontinued in 1620 in a row over fees, the year after the commencement of the St. John's registers, the oldest surviving parish registers in Ireland. The Canon of 1634 required every parish and chapel in Ireland to keep a book wherein must be written the day and year of every Christening, marriage and burial. The Canon does no appear to have been strictly enforced as no registers in Ireland begin immediately after the date of instruction. Only two registers in Ireland pre-date the Canon, that of St. John's and St. Brigid, Dublin and in only five other instances are registers known to pre-date 1642, amongst which is the Parish of St. Bride.

Republished here are the marriage entries for St. Andrew dating from 1672 to 1800; St. Anne from 1719 to 1800; St. Audoen from 1672 to 1800 and St. Bride from 1632 to 1800. In the first two instances the republished registers date from virtually the foundation of the parishes and in the case of the second two few records pre-date 1632, although the churches are of much older origin. The Registers for St. Bride are noteworthy for a number of reasons, not least because of the large numbers of French names that occur due to the prevalence of French Huguenots that settled within the bounds of the parish. Appendices of occupations and places are included in this publication as are the names of famous individuals such as Napper Tandy and Wolfe Tone. The editor has crossed check the marriage entries against the Dublin Grant Index and has also provided marriage entries found in the Parochial Returns that were not found in the Parish Registers. All of this makes for a most satisfactory and complete publication and in the case of the Parish of St. Bride, the only records that now survive for the parish. The Republication of this number in the series of the Parish Register Society of Dublin remains as relevant to the genealogist and family historian today as they were when the registers were first published. 


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The Parish Register Society of Dublin, The Register of St. Nicholas Without, Dublin, 1694-1739 (1912) The Parish Register Society of Dublin, The Register of St. Nicholas Without, Dublin, 1694-1739 (1912)

Ref: IE0354
ISBN: 1-84630-569-1

Printed for the Parish Register Society of Dublin by William Pollard & Co., and first published in 1912 is volume X of the Parish Register Society of Dublin, the Register of St. Nicholas Without, Dublin, 1694-1739. Republished here on fully-searchable CD-Rom is the earliest surviving register for the Church of St. Nicholas Without which are amongst the oldest surviving parish records in Ireland.

By Act of Parliament in 1875 the parish registers of the Established Church of Ireland were placed under the Control of the Master of the Rolls. However, by the time of the publication of volume I of the Parish Register Society in 1906, one of the main conditions of the Act, namely the concentration, collection and depositing of the parish registers of the former Established Church in the Public Record Office of Ireland in Dublin, had not taken place. In a sense and with hindsight this transpired to be fortuitous as many of the parochial records that did find their way to the Public Record Office were destroyed in the infamous 1922 fire. In line with the formation of a number of Parish Register Societies in England, it was deemed necessary by the founding members of the Parish Register Society of Dublin to make publicly available the older and more important surviving parish registers of the Established Church of Ireland, beginning with the oldest in the country, those of Dublin City, for the valuable work undertaken by genealogists and local and family historians.

There would appear to have been no obligation to keep parish registers in Ireland until the Canon of 1634, although there had been an abortive attempt to introduce a form of public registration as early as 1617. However, this was discontinued in 1620 in a row over fees, the year after the commencement of the St. John's registers, the oldest surviving parish registers in Ireland. The Canon of 1634 required every parish and chapel in Ireland to keep a book wherein must be written the day and year of every Christening, marriage and burial. The Canon does no appear to have been strictly enforced as no registers in Ireland begin immediately after the date of instruction. Only two registers in Ireland pre-date the Canon, that of St. John's and St. Brigid, Dublin and in only five other instances are registers known to pre-date 1642.

In many senses the Parish of St. Nicholas Without is an unusual City Parish. The parish itself was recognised as early as the 12th century, but had no church of its own, the parishioners worshipping in the north transept of the Cathedral Church of St. Patrick and burials taking place in the 'Cabbage Garden' close to the Cathedral. The parish of St. Nicholas Without extended from Kevin Street on the east, to the west end of the Coombe and from the wall on the north to the Cherryorchard near Haroldscross and all of the numerous streets and alleys in between. And as a consequence was probably more densely populated than at the beginning of the 20th century. This situation led to the creation of the new parish of St. Luke. At the time of the restoration of St. Patrick's, St. Nicholas Without was removed from the Cathedral and reunited with St. Luke.

As to the registers themselves, far more Burials than Christenings and it has been surmised that while the registers contain the Christenings for only members of the Established Church, the Burial Registers hold the records for all denominations present in the parish. Until the early 1900s an earlier register for the parish was extant for the periods 1631-1660, but the whereabouts of this then as now is not known. While the Parish Register Society of Dublin had announced that this publication was to continue to 1739, through lack of subscriptions the burials contained therein were cut short and ceased in 1720. The general lack of monies from subscribers to the publication of the Parish Registers meant that that this issue was one of the last undertaken by the Society.

Republished here on fully-searchable CD-Rom, the register for the Parish of St. Nicholas Without from which the entries republished here were taken contained 322 pages, with this publication containing just over 300 pages of text, including an index of names and family names. The Republication of this number in the series of the Parish Register Society of Dublin remains as relevant to the genealogist and family historian today as they were when the registers were first published. 


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The Registers of the Church of St. Michan, Dublin, 1636 - 1700 The Registers of the Church of St. Michan, Dublin, 1636 - 1700

Ref: IE0348
ISBN: 1-84630-559-4

Printed for the Parish Register Society of Dublin by Alexander Thom & Co., and first published in 1909 are volumes II, III and VII of the Parish Register Society of Dublin, the Registers of St. Michan, Dublin, 1634-1700. Republished here on fully-searchable CD-Rom the registers for St. Michan are amongst the oldest surviving parish records in Ireland and unusually for city parishes from this period the register entries are of a most complete nature.

By Act of Parliament on 1875 the parish registers of the Established Church of Ireland were placed under the Control of the Master of the Rolls. However, by the time of the publication of volume I of one of the main conditions of the Act, namely the concentration, collection and depositing of the parish registers of the former Established Church in the Public Record Office of Ireland in Dublin, had not taken place. In a sense and with hindsight this transpired to be fortuitous as many of the parochial records that did find their way to the Public Record Office were destroyed in the infamous 1922 fire. In line with the formation of a number of Parish Register Societies in England, it was deemed necessary by the founding members of the Parish Register Society of Dublin to make publicly available the older and more important surviving parish registers of the Established Church of Ireland, beginning with the oldest in the country, those of Dublin City, for the valuable work undertaken by genealogists and local and family historians.

There would appear to have been no obligation to keep parish registers in Ireland until the Canon of 1634, although there had been an abortive attempt to introduce a form of public registration as early as 1617. However, this was discontinued in 1620 in a row over fees, the year after the commencement of the St. John's registers. The Canon of 1634 required every parish and chapel in Ireland to keep a book wherein must be written the day and year of every Christening, marriage and burial. The Canon does no appear to have been strictly enforced as no registers in Ireland begin immediately after the date of instruction. Only two registers in Ireland pre-date the Canon, that of St. John's and St. Brigid, Dublin and in only five other instances are registers known to pre-date 1642, amongst these are the registers for St. Michan, which date from 1636.

The Parish of St. Michan was from a very early period until the seventeenth century the only parish church standing on the north bank of the River Liffey. Tradition states that the Church was built in 1095 and encompassed the area bounded by Little Cabra, Dublin Bay, the Phoenix Park and the River Liffey. As the number of inhabitants within these bounds grew new parishes had to be divided out of the old St. Michan's, resulting in the formation in the mid-seventeenth-century of Saints Paul, John and lastly Thomas. The registers for t. Michan are unlike any those of the other old city parishes in as much as full-particulars are given for the deceased in the burial registers and in some instances the marriage entries, especially during the Commonwealth period, which run to as many as eight lines.

 


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Parish Register Society Of Dublin, The Register of the Parish of Saint Peter and Saint Kevin, Dublin, 1669-1761, 1911 Parish Register Society Of Dublin, The Register of the Parish of Saint Peter and Saint Kevin, Dublin, 1669-1761, 1911

Ref: IE0344
ISBN: 1-84630-555-1

Printed for the Parish Register Society of Dublin by William Pollard & Co., and first published in 1911 is volume IX of the Parish Register Society of Dublin, the Register of the Parish of St. Peter & St. Kevin, Dublin, 1669-1761. Republished here on fully-searchable CD-Rom this republication contains the Christening, Marriage & Burial Registers from the first two surviving parish registers.

By Act of Parliament on 1875 the parish registers of the Established Church of Ireland were placed under the Control of the Master of the Rolls. However, by the time of the publication of volume I of the Parish Register Society in 1906, one of the main conditions of the Act, namely the concentration, collection and depositing of the parish registers of the former Established Church in the Public Record Office of Ireland in Dublin, had not taken place. In a sense and with hindsight this transpired to be fortuitous as many of the parochial records that did find their way to the Public Record Office were destroyed in the infamous 1922 fire. In line with the formation of a number of Parish Register Societies in England, it was deemed necessary by the founding members of the Parish Register Society of Dublin to make publicly available the older and more important surviving parish registers of the Established Church of Ireland, beginning with the oldest in the country, those of Dublin City, for the valuable work undertaken by genealogists and local and family historians.

There would appear to have been no obligation to keep parish registers in Ireland until the Canon of 1634, although there had been an abortive attempt to introduce a form of public registration as early as 1617. However, this was discontinued in 1620 in a row over fees, the year after the commencement of the St. John's registers, the oldest surviving parish registers in Ireland. The Canon of 1634 required every parish and chapel in Ireland to keep a book wherein must be written the day and year of every Christening, marriage and burial. The Canon does no appear to have been strictly enforced as no registers in Ireland begin immediately after the date of instruction. Only two registers in Ireland pre-date the Canon, that of St. John's and St. Brigid, Dublin and in only five other instances are registers known to pre-date 1642.

During the Restoration Dublin City began a period of rapid expansion and from the centre out to the periphery and this marked the rapid growth of the population within the Parishes of Saints Peter and Kevin, the bounds of which stretched as far as Rathmines, Haroldscross and Milltown to the south and east and to Aungier Steet, Bishop Street and Saint Stephen's Street in the west. However, because of the growth of the population within the parish a new church was required and in 1707 portions of St. Peter and St. Bride were taken to form the new parish of St. Anne. The current republication is a reprint of the earliest two parish registers for the union of Saints Peter and Kevin. The first register contains 476 pages and begins with the Vestry Minutes of St. Kevin's for the year 1669. The second register contains 118 parchment folios and commences in 1721 and ends in 1761. In the main the Christening Registers provide the child's name, parents' names, addresses and some cases the father's occupation. Likewise, the Burial Registers provide the name of the deceased, marital status of women and addresses. This republication also includes confirmation lists for the parish for 1722 and 1726 as well as a comprehensive names index. The Republication of this number in the series of the Parish Register Society of Dublin remains as relevant to the genealogist and family historian today as they were when the registers were first written. 


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The Registers of St. Patrick's, Dublin, 1677-1800 The Registers of St. Patrick's, Dublin, 1677-1800

Ref: IET0093
ISBN: 1-84630-121-1
Number of Pages: 128
File Size: 6 Mb
Availability: Download or CD
downloadable now

Published in 1907 as volume II of Parish Register Society of Dublin, The Registers of Baptisms, Marriages & Burials in the Collegiate and Cathedral Church of St. Patrick, 1677-1800, was transcribed by the then Dean's Vicar of the Cathedral, C. H. P. Price and edited by J. H. Bernard, the Dean of St. Patrick.

Few records from the antiquity of St. Patrick's are now extant and only a few broken Celtic crosses without markings pre-date 1219 when St. Patrick's became a Cathedral. At this time ground was acquired to the south and east of the church for burial and in old records is known as the 'Old Churchyard' or 'Vicars' Bawn'. By the 17th century this burial ground had become overcrowded and new land was consecrated for burial purposes to the south of the Deanery. Known as the 'New Churchyard' or the 'Cabbage Garden' these survived down to the beginning of the 20th century. In addition to these graveyards, St. Patrick's also contains the 'French Churchyard'. Situated to the south of the Cabbage Garden, this served Dublin's Huguenot community in Dublin who worshipped at the Lady Chapel in St. Patrick's for some 150 years.

Needless to say, the Registers of St. Patrick hold burial records for some of Dublin's most eminent citizens such as Jonathan Swift and his 'Stella' as well as fourteen Archbishops of Dublin and a further ten bishops and archbishops, numerous deans, ecclesiastical men and three Lord Chancellors. However, it might come as a surprise to learn that the number of burials and interments far outweigh baptisms and marriages. The reasons for this are simple: the area in which St. Patrick's is situated has never been fashionable and as such was never the place of choice, burial is another thing altogether. As for marriage, most marriages in the Established Church were formalised by licence rather than by ceremony. These marriages, of which there must have been many, did not find their way into the St. Patrick's Registers.

The Registers republished here extend to some 110 pages and a full index of personal and place names are presented at the end of the Registers. This does not, however, cover the small Appendix attached to the publication, which includes interments in the Cathedral and Old Churchyard. These include, in 1652, the burial of Lt. Col. Prime Iron Rochfort, who was executed at the behest of Oliver Cromwell after fighting and winning a duel.

Republished here, the Registers of St. Patrick, 1677-1800 are fully searchable and a welcome addition to genealogists and family historians.

This title is a DOWNLOAD. Please click the link on the receipt to initiate the download. If you would prefer a version on CD-ROM to be posted to you, please select the option below. It will cost an additional €6.00 (ex VAT) which includes all postage charges. 



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